Strategic Action Plan 2017-18

Strategic Action Plan of the Graduate Professional Council 2016-17

Approved: 4/3/2017

Presented By:

The 2016-2017 Graduate Professional Council

Introduction

This year, the Graduate Professional Council (GPC) synthesizes an annual Strategic Action Plan (SAP). The purpose of this document is to share with both institution and our successors of our work this past year, and recommendations for the future. Liaisons, Executive Board Members, and General Body Members contributed to the information in this document which was compiled and edited by Haley Dolosic, President of GPC. While all topics in this document are not exhaustive of what has been accomplished or concerns of the graduate and professional student body, the following pages represent the majority of the works and recommendations of the 2016-17 GPC. We hope that, through this report, the next GPC will be able to carry forward our initiatives, continuing to build on them to provide the best graduate and professional student experience possible for all of our students.

Executive Summary

Following last year’s work to develop our first strategic action plan, this year we broaden the focus of this plan, reaching not only to help develop and strengthen the missions of the GPC, but also to speak to the broader campus institutions and administrators about our needs as graduate and professional students. The following pages outline what the GPC is and does each year. We report on implementation of the 2015-16 SAP and our own initiatives that were brought to fruition in the last year. We then provide detailed recommendations and support for these recommendations both to the University and incoming GPC. The actions and recommendations outlined here seek to uphold and further the mission of the GPC.

Summarized Recommendations to the University

  1. I. Continue to improve and expand spaces where students can communicate across interdisciplinary lines, and provide incentives for individuals to enter such spaces and communicate with others who represent varied segments of the Washington University community.
  2. II. Continue to include graduate and professional students’ opinions and preferences in decisions around new construction, programs, and messaging decisions as they are being developed for varied purposes.
  3. III. Reevaluate and increase limits presently set on the number of mental health visits allowed under our medical insurance.
  4. IV. Continue to strive to increase hiring of underrepresented minorities to faculty and staff positions throughout the university.
  5. V. Provide the Graduate Professional Council with a single space wherein officers are able to conduct the business of the organization including executive board and individual meetings, filing paperwork, and other such activities.
  6. VI. Take into account the schedules of graduate and professional students when coordinating committees, boards, and events where representation of graduate students is requested.

Summarized Recommendations to the GPC 2017-18

I. Review the results of the GPC survey and carefully evaluate which programs should be continued, what should be developed, and which programs should be discontinued.

II. Thoughtfully evaluate the structure of meetings and consider having separate committee meetings outside of General Body meetings.

III. Invite in and share responsibility with members early in the year, creating a larger team to achieve goals of the GPC.

IV. Plan out the event calendar before the fall semester begins, including regular executive board meetings.

V. Carefully and thoughtfully evaluate the committee membership of each individual liaison, making sure to align their liaison goals and committee involvement.

VI. Maintain a connection with previous executive board members in order to build from prior initiatives.

The Mission of the Graduate Professional Council

The Graduate Professional Council (GPC), a member of the National Association of Graduate and Professional Students (NAGPS).

We:

1. Represent and advocate the mutual interests of the graduate and professional students

2. Advise the faculty and administration on important academic and quality-of-life issues

3. Encourage interschool and interdisciplinary cooperation within the university

4. Organize campus-wide social events open to all graduate and professional students

5. Support graduate and professional student organizations

6. Appoint graduate students to serve on university-wide committees

7. Work closely with the ProGradS committee

About the Graduate Professional Council

The Graduate Professional Council (GPC) was founded in 1993, when a group of student leaders identified the need for both academic and social interaction between graduate and professional students of all disciplines. With the assistance and support of the Washington University administration, these student leaders and their successors have consistently brought together graduate student voices throughout the WU community.

From the time of its inception, the GPC has been influential in placing graduate student representatives on university-wide committees, supporting the Board of Trustees’ decision to appoint two graduate and professional student representatives to the Board annually, and facilitating interdisciplinary study and research among Washington University students.

In 2015, the GPC has also introduced an interdisciplinary conference travel award grant of $500, created a Presidential Debate Committee, and approved a new graduate student group. In 2016-17, the group has also begun Cultural Event Grants and Rotating Mixers which serve to facilitate meaningful communication across disciplinary lines in our university. Further, we were able to work with the larger campus community to create cross-disciplinary events to engage students in the Presidential Debates and election of 2016.

GPC provides a network of communication through which student leaders share information about school activities, and supports representative student governments. GPC also plans social opportunities for the graduate and professional community, initiates discussions of

graduate and professional student issues through panel discussions and presentations, and brings important issues to the attention of the university’s administration. GPC meetings and committees are open to all graduate and professional students of Washington University.

Report of Actions 2016-17

Implementation of the 2015-16 SAP: Liaisons

Based on the work of the 2015-16 Executive Board, the GPC began 2016-17 by initiating connections across campus through liaisons. Due to the rapid turnover in our representatives and having many resources focused on the Presidential Debate and related events, liaison positions took a great deal of time to begin connections and spark interest. In addition, we needed to find appropriate staff partners within each of these organizations. When we were able to connect the correct individuals, many liaison relationships grew into fruitful connections which will assuredly be able to develop more fully in coming years. Further, there are a few liaisons named in the 2015-16 plan which did not prove to be connections that were necessary, thus they were discontinued. The following are reports of each individual position in terms of who filled the role and what connections they made.

Innovation and Entrepreneurship Liaison: Rina Amatya (Medicine Representative) was able to connect with Jessica Stanko at the Skandalaris Center and promote Skandalaris events throughout the year. In the future, collaborative events could develop from these connections.

Student Affairs Liaison: Rachel Bick (General Member) and Haley Dolosic (President) served as liaisons to James Parker in Student Affairs. This discussion tended to center around a graduate student entrance and exit survey. We are hopeful to have such a survey completed by the end of the 2016-17 year, making this a great success. We hope to continue communicating with student affairs to express our needs as this segment of the University undergoes large transitions.

Health & Wellness Liaison: Kathryn Koawlczyk (General Member) and Michelle St. Paul (VP of Communications) served as liaisons to Melissa Ruwitch and the Graduate Student Health Advisory Committee. This relationship gave graduate and professional students a voice in the development of wellness initiatives of the University.

Diversity & Inclusion Liaison: John Eads (Brown School Representative) had conversations with Purvi Patel (of the Center for Diversity and Inclusion) and Meg Galindo (Chair Diversity and Inclusion Committee of the GSS), increasing GPC involvement in Diversity and Inclusion initiatives. John did particularly well at sharing events with GPC and encouraging our support of important initiatives such as the Sanctuary Petition.

Housing & Transportation Liaison: Julia Philips (Architecture Representative) made connections, but needed further information on what she should advocate for. To increase our involvement in this area, we should survey the needs of graduate students and then reach out to others to continue to advocate for graduate and professional needs across campuses.

Sustainability Liaison: Rohit Gupta (General Member) was able to make connections with Jennifer Thomas in the Office of Sustainability. Again, further information on the needs and desires of graduate and professional students would allow for greater connections and support for our graduate and professional students.

Alumni & Development Liaison: Linh Vuong (Medicine Representative) was able to make connections with Cathy Sullivan Jannings at Alumni and Development. Fruitful connections and programs are possible through this connection which may link current WashU graduate students with former graduate students where such relationships could be mutually beneficial.

Libraries Liaison: Brian Kahler (Business Representative) made connections with the Library Advisory Committee but was unable to advocate for graduate and professional student needs due to a lack of meetings. In the future, the liaison will be invited to advisory meetings to advocate for graduate and professional needs. In addition, depending upon the results of surveys we should advocate as needed for graduate student needs both within and outside of such meetings.

Policy Liaison: This relationship will need to be developed over the course of the next year. Little contact was reliably developed in this position, yet we feel that it could be a very important position in coming years.

Violence Prevention Liaison: Emily Franz (Brown School) and Chris Fleissner (Law School) both served as liaisons to Austin Sweeney, and both were able to represent graduate and professional concerns in relation to the RSVP Center. We look forward to including membership on the CARE team as part of this liaison’s role.

Community Service Liaison: Claire Fortenberry (Engineering Representative) was able to develop a relationship with La’Rez Wilson and Cara Johnson, developing graduate-centered events and promoting opportunities that are established for all students at WashU. In the future, we hope to conduct events which are specifically designed for graduate students and graduate student groups.

Public Affairs Liaison: This role was underutilized this year due to close connections developed through the Presidential Debate committees. In the future, liaisons should seek to connect with Michael Spear, Julie Flory, or Julie Kennedy in the Public Affairs office of the University.

Social Media Liaison: While this role was envisioned as someone who would control the social media outlets, Michelle St. Paul (VP of Communication) did this and Natalie Rainer (Sam Fox Representative) in this role mainly designed advertisements. Thus, a new name for this role is in order.

New Initiatives of the 2016-17 GPC

Involvement in the Presidential Debate of 2016: Beginning in April of 2016, the GPC took on a key role in promoting student engagement in the Presidential Debate which took place on Washington University’s campus. Through advocating for students and providing a number of enriching experiences, the graduate population was invited to interact with the Presidential Debate as a community. This led to one of our most successful event in the history of the GPC. Such involvement helped to kick start the liaison roles in GPC and provided an opportunity for individuals to take part in other university-wide initiatives.

Cultural Grant: This grant was a sum of money that the GPC executive board decided to put aside particularly for events which would promote connection and collaboration across diverse student populations, particularly where such events had previously not been opened to the entire graduate and professional community. This year this grant was awarded to the Chinese Students and Scholars Association who used it to expand a celebration of Chinese New Year. Through this event many students were able to come and take part in this celebration and make connections across the international-domestic student barrier. We consider this grant a success this year, and we look forward to it continuing in GPC’s future.

Rotating Mixers: As a result of prior years of discussion, this year GPC implemented a rotating mixer which took place across a number of schools throughout the year. These events sought to bring individuals from varied schools into one school for the evening, having them interact in meaningful ways. At one such mixer, Trivia was the theme and individuals were matched across disciplines to play to win trivia together. These events will need to be refined, but show great promise in developing more connections across schools and disciplines.

GPC Survey: As our year was ending, we sought to evaluate whether GPC was fulfilling its role and mission on the Washington University campus to the best of its ability. Thus, we sought to develop a survey to provide us with greater information on graduate and professional students’ opinions of the GPC and our events. The results of this survey are still forthcoming, but we look forward to having a source of information like this for future GPC executive boards. With this data we hope that they will be able to make informed decisions about their plans for the Graduate Professional Council.

Committee Reports on 2016-17

Academic & Professional Development Committee

By Amanda Holmes, VP of Academic & Professional Development, GPC

The Academic and Professional Development Committee of the Graduate Professional Council (“APDC”) works to create and foster programming that aids in the development of graduate and professional students as scholars and future career professionals. The Academic and Professional Development Committee seeks to advocate on behalf of Washington University graduate and professional students within our campus community and beyond in order to create environments that support learning and inclusion.

In the 2016-2017, APDC has done a stellar job of providing events aligned with this mission and hopes to extend its efforts in coming semesters and academic years.

I. Discover

Our university has expressed a renewed commitment to its graduate and professional (“GP”) community. This aligns perfectly with our committee’s desire to see the GP student body served with levels of energy and resources more akin to those for which our undergraduate experience has become well known. In order for the GPC to better serve the academic and professional development of our students, we must understand their diverse needs and how well they are currently met.

Many great resources exist that are not universally known by GP students. They include the Teaching Center, the Writing Center, WUMCHA, the Athletic Complex, University Libraries, and more. We want to evaluate the quality, sources, and methods of information that GP students receive. Some needed resources have already been identified, including spaces and services that better support scholar parents, as well as a culture of inclusion. Our role in APDC is to discover and advocate for whatever resources and programs will enhance and facilitate the development of GP students into superb professors, researchers, professionals, employers, employees, entrepreneurs, and artists.

II. Engage

We must engage a critical mass of students. This is both to conduct our needs assessment and to encourage GP to see GPC and the greater university as their partner in academic and professional development. GP programs, cultures, needs, and interests vary. As we engage, we can better serve.

III. Refine

Based on our findings, we will refine the approach of our APDC. We’ll continue what is effective at adding value to the GP student experience. We’ll replace whatever doesn’t provide benefit to the GP student body.

III. Program

These refinements will inform our programming, going forward. “Programming” will include not just events, but also initiatives and GP advocacy at our WU campuses. In the interim, we will still program familiar events and initiatives, but we can and should expect them to evolve, as we discover how we should best refine what we do, and engage our fellow GP students, in furtherance of our mission. There are several signature APDC events that have high student involvement that will continue. These include Speed Networking in the Fall and Roads Less Traveled in the Spring. More initiatives to foster growth and development are forthcoming.

Community Service and Engagement

By Josh Chen VP of Community Service, GPC

The Community Service Committee of the Graduate Professional Council will focus on meaningful, creative, and sustained opportunities of community service, providing a variety of opportunities and connections to volunteer organizations in order to increase the number of students engaging in such work.

I. Reaching out to the WashU and St. Louis communities in meaningful and creative ways.

This will be achieved by leveraging partnerships with existing WashU organizations such as the Center for Diversity and Inclusion, and the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement. Community partnerships developed by practicum students at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work and Public Health also serve as a natural avenue for volunteer opportunities. In addition, the GPC will continue to create and provide a variety of volunteer opportunities for students to pursue. Each month will have a major event with a different focus, offering a set of creative yet meaningful ways of reaching out to our community.

II. Creating opportunities which attract a greater number of hands to work.

Every effort will be made to ensure volunteer and civic engagement activities are timely, relevant, and accepting of all cultures as is in line with the GPC’s mission statement. The GPC will remain flexible in the programming of its events, and input from the graduate and professional student body is always encouraged. Opportunities to voice concerns on social and political issues relevant to graduate and professional student life will be provided in the form of national legislative action days with NAGPS and state lobby days at Jefferson City with organizations such as the Center for Diversity and Inclusion.

III. Developing sustained efforts in community involvement.

The intention of the GPC is for graduate and professional students to find a volunteer or civic engagement activity that resonates with them personally, such that it leads to repeated involvement. One way to kickstart this process is through the creation of a graduate and professional student equivalent to the Meet St. Louis program currently offered to WashU undergraduates by the Gephardt Institute. This would allow graduate and professional students to become aware of the historical, cultural, and social context that St. Louis is situated in while orienting students to the surroundings of the greater St. Louis community. It is vital that these community relationships are maintained from year-to-year, so proper documentation of communication and contact information is necessary.

Marketing and Communications

By Michelle St. Paul, VP of Marketing and Communications, GPC

The Marketing and Communications Committee of the Graduate Professional Council will focus on effective and proficient marketing strategies to further reach all corners throughout all graduate schools of Washington University.

Marketing and Communications recognizes that promotion is composed primarily of:

15% Paper flyers/ Postcards

40% Weekly Newsletters/ GPC Website Calendar

35% Social Media

10% Word of Mouth

I. Handbook

A handbook will be updated periodically for future VPs of Marketing and Communications to reference for a smoother transition between former and current officers. This guide will include locations for flyer hanging, point to University guidelines for using the WashU logo, website management instruction, and contacts for LCD screen digital promotion for all schools.

II. Paper Flyers/ Postcards

These ephemeral means of promotion will be considered as a physical approach towards students in the campus environment. Committee members will adhere to flyer hanging rules and regulations, appropriate WashU logo requirements in the design process, and frequent refreshment of flyers distributed throughout the University. Promotional material for future events and meetings will additionally be present at events preceding them.

III. Weekly Newsletters

Concise yet effective newsletters will cover main events sponsored by graduate student groups, as well as events happening across the university that welcome graduate and professional student participation. Newsletters will be sent out every Monday before noon. Additionally, there will be newsletter sign-up sheets provided at each event.

IV. Engagement in Social Media

Marketing and Communications sees social media as a fast and effective tool for promoting material. Digital flyers will be posted at pinnacle times of social media activity. Photos will engage students with the page and will attract attendees to future events.

V. Update/transition of gpc.wustl.edu website

The Current VP of Marketing and Communications will hand off the current WordPress website to the VP-elect. The VP-elect will be put in contact with Washington University staff to coordinate the transition of the wordpress support gpc.wustl.edu to a new graduate student management platform, whether it remains on WordPress or transitions to the new management platform as coordinated by the Liberman Graduate Center and Associate Dean for Graduate Student Affairs (as well as an aligned information technology staff).

Social Programming Committee

By Alan Zhang, VP of Social Programming, GPC

The Social Programming Committee of the Graduate Professional Council works to increase camaraderie and networking to facilitate interdisciplinary connections and foster a supportive social environment that will enhance the graduate student experience and create a common identity for all students.

I. Creation of a Common Washington University Graduate Student Identity

Washington University is a prestigious school with eight graduate schools that cater to approximately 7,000 total graduate students. While each school each has their own insular body to promote student engagement, a common Washington University graduate student identity is lacking. The social programming committee seeks to hold events that facilitate interaction among students and leads to greater student identification with the school as a whole. Each event will derive from preliminary planning that articulates common interest points and similar goals that will, when engaged with the event, bind the students together. Each social event held will feature strategies to encourage intermingling, cooperative learning, and networking among students from different schools, leading to interdisciplinary discussions and diverse social experiences. Some examples of these strategies include pre-event socials with interdisciplinary tutorial (i.e. a multi-vantage point look at baseball or hockey before a baseball or hockey game), cross-school “scavenger” hunts, trivia nights based in one school with questions related tangentially to a variety of disciplines, and events at different campus locations.

II. Increase Engagement in School Events and Discussions

Historically, the Social Programming Committee has the greatest turn-out of events put forth by the GPC, some approximating up to 500 students. Given high attendance at these events, they are ideal for students to learn about school-wide events that will inform their academic, professional, and social development. The Social Programming Committee will use each event to advertise for the myriad of events that are available to students, but are potentially not well-known. To do this, Social Programming Committee members will reach out to student groups prior to events with advertising opportunities, invite student groups to recruit at events, and will provide students with access to lists of upcoming experiences made available to them by Washington University. Multi-channel engagement is imperative. This includes physical posters and messages in Lieberman Graduate Center and School buildings, digital signage on TV screens across buildings, social media Facebook page, email and newsletters.

III. Exposure to Greater St. Louis Community

The Social Programming Committee will work to design and implement events that provide graduate students exposure to the greater St. Louis community. These will enable graduate students to better integrate into the surrounding areas, as most are not from the St. Louis area. Additionally, it will enable community members to interact with our students, leading to increased visibility and the formation of positive opinions of the graduate students at Washington University and the school as a whole. Events in the past have included attendance at Cardinals and Blues games, social events at local restaurants and parks, and activities at local businesses (e.g. ice skating). The recent opening of the National Blues Museum provides a perfect opportunity for future Social Programming.

Recommendations to the University

The following recommendations were carefully considered and discussed by the Graduate Professional Council on many occasions. We hope that these recommendations will be taken into consideration as the university continues to provide and facilitate educational and developmental experiences for graduate and professional students at Washington University in St. Louis.

  1. I. Continue to improve and expand spaces where students can communicate across interdisciplinary lines, and provide incentives for individuals to enter such spaces and communicate with others who represent varied segments of the Washington University community.

At present, it is evident that there is great benefit to crossing disciplinary boundaries and making connections across the university. However, the only space where such productive interactions appear to be taking place for graduate students is at the Liberman Graduate Center on the Danforth Campus. We believe that an increase in spaces like this one, which invite graduate students specifically, across both campuses, may provide incentives for individuals to communicate outside of their departments and programs.

  1. II. Continue to include graduate and professional students’ opinions and preferences in decisions around new construction, programs, and messaging decisions as they are being developed for varied purposes.

Recently, graduate and professional students have been consulted on the development of construction initiatives and newly developed positions in the graduate school. Such inclusion has been highly appreciated and many graduate and professional students desire for it to continue as we appreciate that our opinions, about what would impact graduate and professional students, are taken into account for these decisions.

  1. III. Reevaluate and increase limits presently set on the number of mental health visits allowed under our medical insurance.

Through discussions and collaborations on campus, it is evident that students who are on the University’s health insurance are opposed to the limits and constraints which are presently placed on individuals who are seeking mental health services. Any clause which limits overall support for visits to a specific amount or requires that individuals seek care on campus, where their students are, negatively impacts those seeking this support. The University, as the negotiator for a single plan for students, needs to take this into account as new contracts for healthcare are discussed. This is a vital issue to graduate and professional students, and we wish to advocate this desire on their behalf.

  1. IV. Continue to strive to increase hiring of underrepresented minorities to faculty and staff positions throughout the university.

As is evident when looking around the University, there is lack of representation for specific segments of the Washington University community. While efforts are being made to change this reality through hiring and retention, it is vital that such efforts not stagnate but continue to develop the diversity represented in our faculty and staff at our University. This is another vital issue to graduate and professional students, and we wish to advocate this desire on their behalf.

  1. V. Provide the Graduate Professional Council with a single space wherein officers are able to conduct the business of the organization including executive board and individual meetings, filing paperwork, and other such activities.

At present, the Graduate Professional Council holds all meetings in the Liberman Graduate Center. This wonderful space allows us to gather as a body to discuss issues and initiatives, during both our days and evenings. Yet, GPC seeks another space which is uniquely for the GPC and the work it does. While we do have access to a shared storage closet, and have our own drawers for storage in the Liberman Graduate Center, GPC has felt the need for a space wherein work and meetings can be conducted throughout the year. In our work with the undergraduate Student Union, it became evident that these individuals were provided with an office where they could hold meetings between students which could be private in nature. This is a luxury that is not possible for many of the GPC officers, who do not have offices on campus. While we understand that office space on campus must be allocated judiciously, we feel that the GPC does the work of the university, representing half of its population, and therefore should be able to have space to work in that is dedicated specifically to its mission. Such a space is particularly vital as many of the leaders and members of GPC do not have offices on campus wherein they can conduct meetings, file important paperwork, or simply complete tasks associated with GPC work. In addition, if this space were in close proximity to the Liberman Graduate Center, such an office could facilitate further collaboration between the Liberman Graduate Center, varied all-university student groups, and the Graduate Professional Council. For these reasons, we make this request.

  1. VI. Take into account the schedules of graduate and professional students when coordinating committees, boards, and events where representation of graduate students is requested.

While this request may seem trivial, for those who take on service positions to the university, it is a continual frustration that they are asked to attend meetings which already have specific dates and times associated which are not fixed year to year and may be rescheduled due to a change in a single individual’s calendar. Although graduate and professional students understand that it is not their place to dictate the time and location of such meetings, it is quite difficult to represent those who you are elected to represent when you are consistently unable to attend meetings. For example, this year the ProGRADs selection for the Board of Trustee Representative interviews took place on a Wednesday afternoon. As all Architecture graduate students have courses at this time, they were not able to represent these students at this meeting, and their voice were simply left out of the conversation. This is just one example. In other instances, students skip classes in order to attend these meetings, ignoring their primary reason for attending WashU so that they can fulfill their service commitments. As such, moving forward the consultation of graduate student schedules when scheduling non-fixed-time meetings where the goal of such meetings is to bring together graduate and professional students, faculty, and administration, such as ProGRADs, should at least communicate with known representatives prior to scheduling these meetings so that the greatest number of students might be able to attend and give voice to graduate and professional student concerns across campus.

Recommendations to the Incoming GPC

In our time as leaders of the GPC, the executive board compiled these recommendations such that individuals who take control of this body will be guided to take excellent steps from their first day.

  1. I. Review the results of the GPC survey and carefully evaluate which programs should be continued, what should be developed, and which programs should be discontinued.

Through the results of the survey, the incoming GPC should have a great deal of data to work with in making decisions as they develop a new year of the GPC. It is important to rely on this data even when it is not the data we hope for.

  1. II. Thoughtfully evaluate the structure of meetings and consider having separate committee meetings outside of General Body meetings.

Throughout the past year, GPC has begun to accomplish a different set of tasks during General Body meetings, voting on important initiatives, and disseminating key information about topics including unionization, the Presidential Debate, and upcoming parking changes. While taking on these new roles, it has become increasingly difficult to meet the needs of committees in terms of taking time to meet and discuss important initiatives, events, and liaison information. Thus, it is time to decide if the length of meetings should be extended, or if individuals would prefer to have meetings with committees outside of the General Body Meeting. Committee membership and liaison roles should still be required of all representatives.

  1. III. Carefully and thoughtfully evaluate the committee membership of each individual liaison, making sure to align their liaison goals and committee involvement.

As initiatives develop, it is vital that the key players and aligned liaisons are on the same committees, thus the GPC should consider reorganizing the placement of such liaisons. (Perhaps, for example, the Diversity and Inclusion Liaison should work with Community Service Committee rather than Academic and Professional Development.) We leave the decisions of this reorganization to our newly elected executive board and representatives.

  1. IV. Invite in and share responsibility with members early in the year, creating a larger team to achieve goals of the GPC.

It is vital that all members of GPC feel welcome and encouraged to participate in the Graduate Professional Council and its events. We eased into this notion in the past year, and had a hard time getting members on board. We recommend that you, instead, give these representatives opportunities to take ownership of events in order to develop future leaders and achieve goals of GPC right from their first day of involvement.

  1. V. Plan out the event calendar before the fall semester begins, including regular executive board meetings.

We recommend that you organize in advance as it allows for events to run more smoothly and successfully. Despite many competing schedules, it is vital that the executive is able to meet to make decisions at least once monthly. Thus, decision about when these meetings are should be made as early as possible.

  1. VI. Maintain a connection with previous executive board members in order to build from prior initiatives.

We are delighted to stay in contact and provide you with a base to take the GPC on the next steps in its development at Washington University in St. Louis. We look forward to hearing from you.

Approval

We the GPC do approve of this document on ____April 3, 2017____.